/ Mineral & Gemstone Database

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Most Popular Gemstone Colors: Clear Gemstones, Black Gemstones, Blue Gemstones, Brown Gemstones, Green Gemstones, OrangeGemstones, Pink Gemstones, Red Gemstones, Violet Gemstones, White Gemstones, Yellow Gemstones

Achroite Tourmaline

Achroite Tourmaline: Colorless Tourmaline, also known as white or Achroite Tourmaline is the name given to the clear or colorless version of Tourmaline. The word achroite is Greek for colorless. If you are into birthstones then Achroite Tourmaline is one of the ones used for October. If you follow the zodiac then it's used to represent Libra. Tourmaline in general is found on every continent and is possibly the (read full)

Agate Chalcedony

Agate Chalcedony: Agate Chalcedony differs from other Chalcedony in that it often has distinct banding. In fact some slices of Agate may appear to have banding similar to that of tree rings. Due to its porous nature it is often colored (by humans) black, red, green, or blue to further increase its visual appeal. Agate Chalcedony is found in Brazil, China, Germany ,Hungary, Mexico, Uruguay, the United States, and (read full)


Albite: Albite is a member of the feldspar species as is predominantly a white or whitish mineral. A fine Albite gem will be colorless (mostly), or colored similar to moonstone. Some of the better specimens have been found in upper North America including the United States and Canada In 1815 Albite was given the Latin name albus which literally means white. Albite astrological sign is that of A (read full)


Almandine: Almandine or Almandite is a member of the Garnet group, and is associated with the planet Pluto. Low quality pyrope is often cataloged and sold as Almandine. Almandine is generally darker than pyrope. Almandine colors vary from red to dark red, purple to purplish red, and even pink. Almandine is valued fairly low at somewhere between $5 and $225 a carat all dependent upon clarity, color, cut, an (read full)


Amber: Amber is one of the few organic gemstones that exist. Amber is made when tree resin is fossilized. Most people I speak with directly think that its sap, but this is not the case. The word sap and resin are used almost interchangeably but there are a few differences. Sap is the sugar and water mixture found in trees, while resin is the liquid that oozes from cuts in the trees outer shell. Due to i (read full)


Amblygonite: Amblygonite is a not so popular gem whose greek name means crooked. It comes in green, clear, yellow, and even purple. Older cut specimens may have slightly rounded facet edges due to the gems lack hardness (6 of 10). Amblygonite can be found in Brazil, France, the United States, Burma, and even Sweden. It may be confused easily with Brazilianite. (read full)


Amethyst: Amethyst is the most coveted stone in the quartz group, and it is sometimes confused with beryl. It is usually found layered with milky quartz, and its color varies from purple to violet. It is sometimes sold as Ametrine, but this is actually a combined variation of 2 gems; Amethyst and Citrine. Amethyst like Agate Chalcedony can be found in geodes. There are many types of synthetic Amethyst aro (read full)