Cross Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Cross gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.


Staurolite: Staurolite is a hydrous magnesium aluminum silicate that crystallizes in the monoclinic system. It appears as coarse, dark gold-brown prisms, or sometimes reddish-brown to black stubby crystals. On weathered rock, it stands out in contrast like sand-coated yellowish brown prisms. Surfaces are often rough or covered with an earthy coating because of natural alteration. It frequently occurs in ch (read full)


Ivory: Ivory is an organic gem material, largely obtained from the tusks of African and Indian (Asiatic) elephants, but also from the teeth and tusks of the hippopotamus, walrus, and other mammals. Like bones, it consists mainly of calcium phosphate in the form of oxyapatite and a small quantity of calcium carbonate, bound together by large amounts of the proteinaceous organic substance dentine, to form (read full)


Dolomite: Dolomite is similar to calcite and sits along side it in limestone. It usually occurs as a secondary mineral, formed by the reaction of magnesium-bearing fluids seeping through the limestone. It may be colorless, or white to cream and even yellow brown, sometimes pale pink. It has a vitreous luster and is translucent. The faces of dolomite crystals are often curved, sometimes so acutely that th (read full)


Epidote: Epidote is widespread, forms a continuous series of minerals, ending with clinozoisite, which contains no iron. It occurs as crystals elongated and often striated parallel to length, and also as massive, fibrous, or granular habits. Epidote has a yellow-green color, ranges from yellowish-greenish to greenish-black. It has vitreous luster, and is transparent to nearly opaque. It has one perfe (read full)


Pyrite: Pyrite is an iron sulphide mineral with a cubic crystal system and is dimorphous with marcasite. It occurs as cubic crystals with striated faces, or in the form of pentagonal dodecahedra, usually well-crystallized, either isolated or in small, often well-formed groups, or as "iron cross" twins. It is a characteristic, brassy-yellow or pale-gold color, opaque and with a metal luster. It sometimes (read full)


Dravite: Dravite also called Brown Tourmaline is a sodium magnesium-rich mineral in the Tourmaline group of silicates, with a hexagonal system. Other members of this group include elbaite (sodium lithium aluminum rich); schorl and buergerite (sodium iron rich); uvite (calcium magnesium rich); and liddicoatite (calcium lithium aluminum rich). A continuous solid solution series exists between uvite and dravi (read full)


Oligoclase: Oligoclase is a mineral of the plagioclase feldspar series, other members of which are Labradorite and Anorthite. It forms as tabular crystals, which are commonly twinned, with parallel or criss-cross twinning striations. It appears as massive, granular, or compact. It may show brilliant reflections from inclusions. It is light, transparent to translucent, with a vitreous luster and may come in (read full)


Labradorite: Labradorite is a sodium-rich plagioclase feldspar which displays a particular type of iridescence on a dark ground. Plagioclase feldspars are rock-forming, calcium-sodium minerals which form a continuous series ranging from albite, through oligoclase, andesine, labradorite, and bytownite to anorthite. Precise classification is generally not possible in hand specimens, and their physical properties (read full)


Diopside: Diopside is a type of Clinopyroxene, which are abundant, rock-forming minerals. These are embedded and surface-growing crystals, short columnar, and tabular, almost square or octagonal in cross section. It is the magnesium-bearing end member in the isomorphous, monoclinic diopside-hedenbergite series, a complete solid solution series in which two intermediate members, salite and ferrosalite, have (read full)