France Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of France gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.

Amblygonite

Amblygonite: Amblygonite is a not so popular gem whose greek name means crooked. It comes in green, clear, yellow, and even purple. Older cut specimens may have slightly rounded facet edges due to the gems lack hardness (6 of 10). Amblygonite can be found in Brazil, France, the United States, Burma, and even Sweden. It may be confused easily with Brazilianite. (read full)

Aragonite

Aragonite: Aragonite is made from calcium carbonate and found near sedimentary rocks. Colors include clear (when free from impurities), yellow, blue, and even pink. Aragonite can be found in Turkey, France, United States,the bahamas and many other places around the world. Aragonite sand isn't necessarily mined but rather gathered from locations in and around reef systems. This sand is then stored and pack (read full)

Epidote

Epidote: Epidote is widespread, forms a continuous series of minerals, ending with clinozoisite, which contains no iron. It occurs as crystals elongated and often striated parallel to length, and also as massive, fibrous, or granular habits. Epidote has a yellow-green color, ranges from yellowish-greenish to greenish-black. It has vitreous luster, and is transparent to nearly opaque. It has one perfe (read full)

Axinite

Axinite: Axinite is a honey brownish to dark brown gem that is named after the axe head like crystal structures that are usually found. It is usually found in and around granite deposits, and is often mistaken (and sometimes sold by mistake) as smokey quartz. The gem is piezoelectric and because of this has been used to remove hair and lint from unwanted objects. A negative side effect of this is that it (read full)

Malachite

Malachite: Malachite is a bright green, basic copper carbonate. It appears as fibrous, radiating aggregates with silky to dull luster, and its crystals are adamantine. Acicular crystals are common. It commonly occurs as a green film on other copper minerals and as botryoidal or reniform masses with concretionary, banded structure and emerald green color. The color of the glassy, lustrous crystals is dark (read full)

Hauyne

Hauyne: Hauyne is a blue feldspathoid rock-forming mineral, one of four members of the sodalite mineral group that is a component of lapis lazuli. The other three are lazurite, sodalite, and nosean. It is a complex mineral of sodium, calcium, aluminum silicate, and sulfate. Hauyne forms very bright and attractive though uncommon transparent blue dodecahedral or pseudo-octahedral crystals of the cubic sy (read full)

Dumortierite

Dumortierite: Dumortierite is a variety of gemstone of basic aluminum borosilicate with an orthorhombic crystal system. It appears usually in columnar or fibrous, radiating aggregates, sometimes reddish brown, dark blue, violet-blue. On the rare occasions that dumortierite forms crystals, they are prismatic. Faceted or prismatic blue or violet samples are rare, due to scarcity of individual crystals. It is (read full)

Hypersthene

Hypersthene: Hypersthene is an important iron-rich orthopyroxene in the Pyroxene group with an orthorhombic crystal system. Other orthopyroxenes forming a complete chemical series with hypersthene are enstatite and bronzite. When the iron content of enstatite increases than it is converted into hypersthene, therefore it is opaque. Pyroxenes are a widespread group of rock-forming silicates. Hypersthene (read full)

Citrine

Citrine: Citrine is an attractive type of quartz, which is the commonest mineral on the earth's surface. But citrine itself is an uncommon macrocrystalline variety. Its yellow color brought about by its iron hydrate content, its reddish yellow from a trace of ferric iron. It forms hexagonal prisms, terminated by pyramidal shapes. Its faces are often striated, and the crystals twinned and distorted, having (read full)

Kyanite

Kyanite: Kyanite is an aluminum silicate that occurs as elongated and tabular in groups of light-blue crystals darker toward the center, or flat, bladed crystals in schists and gneisses, or as radiating rosettes in quartz. It is trimorphous with sillimanite and andalusite. Kyanite is also known as disthene, meaning, "double strength." This refers to the fact that the hardness along the length of kyanite c (read full)

Staurolite

Staurolite: Staurolite is a hydrous magnesium aluminum silicate that crystallizes in the monoclinic system. It appears as coarse, dark gold-brown prisms, or sometimes reddish-brown to black stubby crystals. On weathered rock, it stands out in contrast like sand-coated yellowish brown prisms. Surfaces are often rough or covered with an earthy coating because of natural alteration. It frequently occurs in ch (read full)

Jet Lignite

Jet Lignite: Jet is an organic gem material composed of lignite, and is a bituminous coal which can be polished. It is compact, homogeneous, has a hard, glossy surface and black interior variety of fossilized lignite or coal. It is an opaque black coalified fossilized drift wood from the coniferlike, 180 million years old 'Araucaria' or monkey puzzle tree that has been dried and fractured following death of (read full)

Serpentine

Serpentine: Serpentine may refer to a single mineral but more often to a group of minerals including antigorite, chrysotile, clinochrysotile, and lizardite, which are altered products of basic and ultra-basic rocks. Rock composed of these minerals is called serpentinite. It comes in all the hues of green.
In mineralogy, serpentine is divided into three polymorphs, crystals with the same chemical substanc (read full)

Jasper Chalcedony

Jasper Chalcedony: Jasper is the opaque form of Chalcedony, the microcrystalline varieties of quartz that form concretionary deposits, partially of organic origin in the case of jasper. It is commonly microscopically fibrous, massive, and has a nearly wax-like luster. It has a lower density than ordinary quartz. It is the archetypal collectable beach pebble, dense, fine crystalline, translucent to opaque, and cons (read full)

Gypsum

Gypsum: Gypsum is the most common sulphate mineral. It is usually the first evaporite mineral to be precipitated form water due to its poor solubility. Varieties include Selenite (or "spectacle stone), which is colorless and transparent; Satin Spar, the fibrous, translucent form with silky luster, which when cut cabochon shows pearly chatoyant effects; Alabaster, used for ornaments, which is firm, fine-gr (read full)

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite: Rhodocrosite is a manganese carbonate, a mineral of the calcite series with a hexagonal crystal system. It is isomorphous with calcite and siderite. It occurs as semitransparent, rhombohedral crystals with poor luster, frequently saddle-shaped, growing into druses, or as concretionary masses, sometimes with irregular, contorted veining. It has low hardness and perfect rhombohedral cleavage. Norm (read full)