Resistant Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Resistant gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.

Goshenite Beryl

Goshenite Beryl: Goshenite is a colorless sodium-rich gem variety of Beryl, a group which includes Emerald and Aquamarine. Other gem beryls include Heliodor and Morganite. It also appears are pale-green, apple-green, to bluish. All beryls are resistant to chemicals with the exception of fluoric acid. They are brittle and therefore easily damaged by knocks, have a vitreous luster, and occur with aquamarine. Their (read full)

Diamond

Diamond: In fact Diamond is the only gem material comprised of a single chemical element: pure carbon, like graphite. But the atoms in diamond have been forced into a compact, three-dimensional structure by the high pressures in the upper mantle, where it is formed. Thus diamond is much harder and has a higher specific gravity (3.52) than graphite . There is nothing comparable to it in hardness; it is ther (read full)

Chrysoberyl

Chrysoberyl: Chrysoberyl appears as prismatic, tabular crystals often v-shaped twins forming pseudo-hexagonal crystals. Single crystals are rare. May be colorless, green, yellow, gray or brown. A variety, alexandrite, is red in tungsten light but dark green in daylight. This pronounced color change is highly-prized, and the exact tone of colors is important, the ideal being brilliant green turning to fie (read full)

Dolomite

Dolomite: Dolomite is similar to calcite and sits along side it in limestone. It usually occurs as a secondary mineral, formed by the reaction of magnesium-bearing fluids seeping through the limestone. It may be colorless, or white to cream and even yellow brown, sometimes pale pink. It has a vitreous luster and is translucent. The faces of dolomite crystals are often curved, sometimes so acutely that th (read full)

Gold

Gold: Gold is a Native Element that appears in very rare, small, octahedral, cubic, and dodecahedral crystals. It normally occurs in very small, shapeless grains, sheets, and flakes. Dendrites are rare. Nuggets are common in alluvial or glacial deposits. It is of yellow color, varying in brightness, depending on the impurities present. This bright, rich yellow is resistant to tarnishing. Gold is often (read full)

Sillimanite

Sillimanite: Sillimanite is a grayish-blue aluminum silicate with an orthorhombic crystal system. It is trimorphic with andalusite and kyanite. All three have the same chemical compound but their atoms each arrange to create three different crystal forms. It appears as long, slender crystals without distinct terminations, in off-white, gray, brown, pale green, slate-blue, blue-green, and these crystals are of (read full)

Emerald

Emerald: Emerald is the most prized variety of the mineral Beryl. It sometimes fetches higher prices than diamond. It appears as pale green to bright green. Though it is the green variety of beryl, not all gem-quality green beryls are called emeralds; yellow-green stones are called "heliodors;"soft blue-green or even pale green specimens are called "aquamarines." The typical color of emerald is a bea (read full)

Zircon

Zircon: Zircon is a zirconium silicate with a tetragonal crystal system, and also contains thorium and uranium. It appears as stubby, prismatic, isolated or sometimes dipyramidal, like two pyramids connected at their bases; or in twins, colorless to yellow, red, brown, gray or green, in irregular granules. It is very hard, heavy, with indistinct cleavage, and shell-like fracture. It is sometimes perfect (read full)