Zinc Carbonate Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Zinc Carbonate gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.

Phosphophyllite

Phosphophyllite: Phosphophyllite is a very rare mineral, a hydrated zinc iron manganese phosphate with a monoclinic crystal system. It appears as long prismatic or thick tabular crystals. It is colorless to deep bluish-green. Polysynthetic twinned crystals are common. It is semi-hard, light, with excellent prismatic cleavage. Translucent to transparent with vitreous luster. It turns gray and loses water when hea (read full)

Smithsonite

Smithsonite: Smithsonite is a mineral in the group of Nitrates, Carbonates, Borates, with a hexagonal crystal system. It appears uncommonly in rhombohedral or scalenohedral crystals. But most of the time it appears with curved faces, like a thick creamy aqua-green mixture poured on rock and left to aggregate in clusters shaped like bunches of grapes, rounded, kidney-like, or to form like elegant icicles, and (read full)

Cerussite

Cerussite: Cerussite is a colorless carbonate of the aragonite mineralogical classification. It appears as colorless or white crystals with grayish tints, elongated and generally twinned to form a reticulated network with 60-degree angles, as stubby, tabular crystals in star- or heart-shaped twins. It can also be grey, greenish, or blue as a result of inclusions, such as lead, or copper. Impure cerussite is (read full)

Sphalerite

Sphalerite: Sphalerite is a zinc iron sulfide mineral formed in an isometric system. It is trimorphous with wurtzite and matraite. All three have the same chemical compound but crystallize in three different forms. The most common crystal forms of sphalerite are in dodecahedrons and tetrahedrons, elegant three-sided formations, often twinned, and otherwise usually massive, thus looking like brownish-black or (read full)

Barite

Barite: Barite also called Baryte or heavy spar is a clear to yellowish to blue mineral that is very soft and not well suited for making of gemstones. (Its a 3 on the harness scale). Its found near lead-zinc mines within limestone deposits. All in all a nice item for a collector, but in terms of long term jewelry this is not a very suitable gem for rings, and necklaces as it will break and shear apart wh (read full)

Malachite

Malachite: Malachite is a bright green, basic copper carbonate. It appears as fibrous, radiating aggregates with silky to dull luster, and its crystals are adamantine. Acicular crystals are common. It commonly occurs as a green film on other copper minerals and as botryoidal or reniform masses with concretionary, banded structure and emerald green color. The color of the glassy, lustrous crystals is dark (read full)

Rhodonite

Rhodonite: Rhodonite is a silicate of manganese-iron-magnesium, a mineral of the Pyroxene group, with a triclinic crystal system. It appears as rare tabular crystals, sometimes with rounded edges and wrinkled faces. It sometimes occurs as distinct, translucent to semiopaque crystals, but more often it is in compact, granular, ot crystalline masses of a patchy, pink, flesh red or brownish red color, often wi (read full)

Pearl

Pearl: Pearl is one of four main ornamental materials that are classified as "organic" gems, the other three being coral, ivory, and amber. About 92 percent of pearl is calcium carbonate, in the form of aragonite crystals, held together by an organic substance (concholin), which is identical to the horny outer layer of oyster shells, plus a small quantity of water. Mother-of-pearl has a simila (read full)

Spinel

Spinel: Spinel is an extensive group of minerals in which magnesium may be replaced with iron, zinc, and above all, manganese. The hardness and fine colors of gem quality spinel, known as Noble Spinel, set it apart as a gem material from other types of spinel. It normally occurs as distinct octahedral crystals, as clusters also of octahedral habit, or as characteristic twins. The crystals are often iso (read full)

Calcite

Calcite: Of all minerals, calcite is by far the richest in forms. It appears as rhombohedral, scalenohedral, or prismatic crystals, often intergrown or twinned. It occurs in masses, colorless or in white, pink, green, or yellow, and often visibly thermoluminescent (emits light when heated). Like quartz, calcite often has twinned structure caused by temperature and stress changes. It is semi-hard, wit (read full)

Onyx

Onyx: Onyx is a translucent to semitransparent variety of Agate, which in turn is a variety of Chalcedony or cryptocrystalline quartz that is porous and consists of straight or parallel banded agate of alternating shades of milky white and black, gray and black, black and red, white and red, white and brown. The term onyx has been erroneously applied as a suffix to Brazilian onyx, Mexican onyx, Orient (read full)

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite: Rhodocrosite is a manganese carbonate, a mineral of the calcite series with a hexagonal crystal system. It is isomorphous with calcite and siderite. It occurs as semitransparent, rhombohedral crystals with poor luster, frequently saddle-shaped, growing into druses, or as concretionary masses, sometimes with irregular, contorted veining. It has low hardness and perfect rhombohedral cleavage. Norm (read full)

Aragonite

Aragonite: Aragonite is made from calcium carbonate and found near sedimentary rocks. Colors include clear (when free from impurities), yellow, blue, and even pink. Aragonite can be found in Turkey, France, United States,the bahamas and many other places around the world. Aragonite sand isn't necessarily mined but rather gathered from locations in and around reef systems. This sand is then stored and pack (read full)

Coral

Coral: Corals are the supporting framework of small polyps. Each coral polyp, a tiny marine animal that lives in enormous colonies, extracts calcium carbonate from the sea and exudes it through their bases to build a protective home around and above itself. Each generation of polyps dies in its protective home and each succeeding generation builds on top of its predecessor. They precipitate calcareous m (read full)

Silver

Silver: Silver is a Native Element with an isometric system, a soft, white, precious metallic element of group 1 of the Periodic System with the symbol Ag. It appears as cubes, octahedrons, and dodecahedrons, and rarely as crystals. Native silver cubes are always small, usually displaying stepped faces, or in compact masses of twining branches, and wirelike forms of a silvery, gray-white color. Aggregate (read full)

Danburite

Danburite: Danburite is a silicate of clear, prismatic crystals, with wedge-shaped terminations. It is occasionally pale yellow, a variety of gemstone feldspars group that resembles topaz. It is very hard, heavy, and has a transparent to vitreous to greasy luster. It fuses easily into a colorless glass, coloring the flame green, has a luminescence that is sky blue to pale blue-green, and also shows red therm (read full)

Vesuvianite

Vesuvianite: Vesuvianite is a hydrous calcium magnesium aluminum silicate with a tetragonal crystal system. It is the preferred name used by mineralogists for all transparent varieties of Idocrase, the name used by gemmologists. It is a gem mineral that appears in diverse colors, and thus is prized by collectors. A compact green variety of vesuvianite that looks like jade is known as californite. A greenish-b (read full)

Taaffeite

Taaffeite: Taaffeite is a very rare beryllium magnesium aluminum mineral. No other mineral has both beryllium and magnesium in its composition. It is one of the few gems to be discovered as a faceted stone instead of a rough, as most gemstones are. Rarely cut as a gem, taaffeite looks like a mauve-colored spinel, and its absorption spectrum is similar to it. But gemologists know they've found taaffeite when (read full)

Fluorite

Fluorite: Fluorite is a widely-distributed mineral in the Halide classification, and is now mined in vast quantities. It is a suitable mineral for collectors and is rarely cut as a gem, but massive varieties are carved as ornamental objects. It appears in cubes, octahedrons, dodecahedrons, while other forms are rarer. Compact, banded, and concretionary masses are frequently found. Most fine crystals of flu (read full)

Ivory

Ivory: Ivory is an organic gem material, largely obtained from the tusks of African and Indian (Asiatic) elephants, but also from the teeth and tusks of the hippopotamus, walrus, and other mammals. Like bones, it consists mainly of calcium phosphate in the form of oxyapatite and a small quantity of calcium carbonate, bound together by large amounts of the proteinaceous organic substance dentine, to form (read full)

Shell

Shell: Shell is the hard, protective, outer layer covering of certain creatures found in saltwater or freshwater, such as mollusks, snails, and turtles. This layer consists of calcium-carbonate and chitin, secreted by the soft tissue mantle of most mollusks. The inner surface of the shell is made from smooth nacre which covers the mantle.
Shell is used as inexpensive material for various purposes (read full)

Sodalite

Sodalite: Sodalite is a sodium aluminum silicate chloride in the Sodalite group with an isometric crystal system. Its royal blue forms are the best known. As a mineral, it is a principal component of lapis lazuli. It appears very rare as dodecahedrons, crystals with 12 faces, but usually it shows as compact masses, bright blue, white or gray with green tints. It is unsaturated and rarely appears with inclu (read full)

Zoisite

Zoisite: Zoisite is a hydrous calcium aluminum silicate in the Epidote group, with an orthorhombic crystal system, three crystal axes at right angles to each other, all of varying lengths. It appears in elongated, prismatic crystals, with fine parallel lines on the prism faces and usually poorly terminated. It also appears frequently in formless grains, poorly-defined crystals, rodlike aggregates and gran (read full)