Metallic Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Metallic gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.


Silver: Silver is a Native Element with an isometric system, a soft, white, precious metallic element of group 1 of the Periodic System with the symbol Ag. It appears as cubes, octahedrons, and dodecahedrons, and rarely as crystals. Native silver cubes are always small, usually displaying stepped faces, or in compact masses of twining branches, and wirelike forms of a silvery, gray-white color. Aggregate (read full)


Hematite: Hematite is considered the most important Iron Ore mineral. Its crystals appear as reasonably thick. They may be tabular, or rhombohedral, and occasionally prismatic or pyramidal. Tabular crystals may form as rosettes, when they are called "iron roses." It also occurs as massive, compact, columnar, fibrous, reniform, botryoidal, stalactitic, foliated, and granular. When hematite forms in a renif (read full)


Cassiterite: Cassiterite may form as short or slender prismatic, or bipyramidal, elbow-shaped crystals. It has a crystal surface reflecting light as in a mirror. They may occur as massive, granular, botryoidal, and reniform. When found in granular, banded, fibrous masses, it looks like wood. When found in groups of large bright crystals, it is usually called "diamond tin." A red variety cut for collectors is k (read full)


Rutile: Rutile with anatase and brookite is a trimorph of titanium oxide in the Rutile group.
It forms characteristic slender prismatic striated lengthways, variably terminated and often geniculate twinned crystals of the tetragonal system. Elbow- and heart-shaped (geniculated) twin crystals are common. It is hard, heavy, fragile, with perfect cleavage. It has a metallic to adamantine lustre an (read full)


Dolomite: Dolomite is similar to calcite and sits along side it in limestone. It usually occurs as a secondary mineral, formed by the reaction of magnesium-bearing fluids seeping through the limestone. It may be colorless, or white to cream and even yellow brown, sometimes pale pink. It has a vitreous luster and is translucent. The faces of dolomite crystals are often curved, sometimes so acutely that th (read full)


Gold: Gold is a Native Element that appears in very rare, small, octahedral, cubic, and dodecahedral crystals. It normally occurs in very small, shapeless grains, sheets, and flakes. Dendrites are rare. Nuggets are common in alluvial or glacial deposits. It is of yellow color, varying in brightness, depending on the impurities present. This bright, rich yellow is resistant to tarnishing. Gold is often (read full)


Enstatite: Enstatite is the most common silicate under the Orthopyroxene group in the larger classification of Pyroxene minerals (which are rock-forming silicates). Orthopyroxenes form a chemical series composed of the magnesium-rich enstatite, and the iron-containing bronzite and hypersthene. It has an orthorhombic crystal system and appears rarely as stubby, prismatic crystals, but more commonly in fibr (read full)


Oligoclase: Oligoclase is a mineral of the plagioclase feldspar series, other members of which are Labradorite and Anorthite. It forms as tabular crystals, which are commonly twinned, with parallel or criss-cross twinning striations. It appears as massive, granular, or compact. It may show brilliant reflections from inclusions. It is light, transparent to translucent, with a vitreous luster and may come in (read full)


Sphalerite: Sphalerite is a zinc iron sulfide mineral formed in an isometric system. It is trimorphous with wurtzite and matraite. All three have the same chemical compound but crystallize in three different forms. The most common crystal forms of sphalerite are in dodecahedrons and tetrahedrons, elegant three-sided formations, often twinned, and otherwise usually massive, thus looking like brownish-black or (read full)


Labradorite: Labradorite is a sodium-rich plagioclase feldspar which displays a particular type of iridescence on a dark ground. Plagioclase feldspars are rock-forming, calcium-sodium minerals which form a continuous series ranging from albite, through oligoclase, andesine, labradorite, and bytownite to anorthite. Precise classification is generally not possible in hand specimens, and their physical properties (read full)


Tektites: Tektites are glass specimens rich in silica that many believed were actually meteorites. But, the locations in which tektites have been found, and their chemistry, led scientists to suggest that they may not in fact have come from outside planet Earth. Another conjecture is that tektites are formed from rocks that melted after being hit by a meteorite. Tektites actually have a composition not unl (read full)


Diopside: Diopside is a type of Clinopyroxene, which are abundant, rock-forming minerals. These are embedded and surface-growing crystals, short columnar, and tabular, almost square or octagonal in cross section. It is the magnesium-bearing end member in the isomorphous, monoclinic diopside-hedenbergite series, a complete solid solution series in which two intermediate members, salite and ferrosalite, have (read full)