Anglesite is a mineral with a hardness of 3 out of 10 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness [?]. These Orthorhombicly structured gems are made of lead sulfate, their full chemical compound being PbSO4.

Anglesite is a very soft gem just slightly harder than gold and silver and as such it does not hold facets well/cut easily.

Because of its softness it tends to scratch, and these scratches will take away from the value and appearance of this gem.

Once cut this gem will not do well in rings as it will quickly become scratched and its edges worn round.

This gem is usually colorless or clear, but also comes in grey, yellow, purple, and brown.

All in all a nice gem but due to its softness it is not suited for all occasions.

The specific gravity [?] for Anglesite is 6.35, it's refractive index [?] is 1.87-1.89, and it's double refraction [?] is 0.017.


Discovered by William Withering in 1783 in Anglesey, giving the gem its name Anglesite.

Industrial Usages

There are no known industrial usages for Anglesite, this is most likely due to its lack of hardness.

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