Polished Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Polished gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.


Azurite: Azurite is a gorgeous stone that when polished into a sphere may look very much like the planet earth. It's blues, and greens look like oceans and forests. It gets its name from the bluish color. The word azure means bluish purple in Old French and Middle English. In Spanish azul is blue. This gem is usually only polished as it is very soft, and can not hold a facet well. (4 out of 10 on the Moh (read full)


Bloodstone: Bloodstone is a member of the Chalcedony group. Why is it called Bloodstone? Well because in polished and rough form this gem / mineral looks like blood, on a stone. (see photo) Bloodstone is sometimes referred to as Plasma or Heliotrope. Heliotrope is a birthstone for March. The name plasma is used to define a bloodstone with yellow inclusions, and not red ones.Despite its relative hardness (7 o (read full)

Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz: Smoky or Brown Quartz is a commonly occurring quartz mineral that gets it's name from the smoky or cloudy interior. A well polished piece of yellowish smoky quartz may appear like amber, while a well cut one may look similar to a brown tourmaline or andalusite. With a Mohs hardness of 7 quartz in general is well suited for jewelry as it will hold a facet or edge fairly well. Variations called (read full)

Agate Chalcedony

Agate Chalcedony: Agate Chalcedony differs from other Chalcedony in that it often has distinct banding. In fact some slices of Agate may appear to have banding similar to that of tree rings. Due to its porous nature it is often colored (by humans) black, red, green, or blue to further increase its visual appeal. Agate Chalcedony is found in Brazil, China, Germany ,Hungary, Mexico, Uruguay, the United States, and (read full)


Aventurine: Aventurine is a quartz mineral that is most often used to crave ornate animal or spiritual figures. Aventurescence is a term used to describe the shimmering of this stone that is caused by mica inclusions. The color is almost always green, however sometimes it is blue, or green with hints of blue, or brown. Aventurine is ideal for the carving of figures, but not the best material in the world for (read full)

Chatoyant Quartz

Chatoyant Quartz: When quartz contains similarly-oriented fibrous inclusions, and is then appropriately-cut, in cabochon, curved stones display what is known as chatoyancy, meaning 'like a cat's eye.' The result is a series of minor gemstones differing only in their ground color and the mobile reflection. Comes in colors white, gray, green, yellow, brown. When the ground color is greenish-gray or green, the gem (read full)

Fire Agate

Fire Agate: Fire Agate is a term applied to much of the variety of chalcedony that occurs as botryoidal, consisting of crystals of minute platy inclusion of an iron mineral goethite or limonite minerals over the layers of chalcedony, producing a vivid rainbow containing every color in the spectrum, an iridescent, fire-like appearance, with careful polishing away of the brown outside layers. When polished, it (read full)


Turquoise: Turquoise is a hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminum in the Phosphates, Arsenates, Vanadates group, with a triclinic crystal system. It rarely occurs as prismatic crystals. It is usually found as light-blue or green masses, nodules, and veins, sometimes filling cavities in various rocks. When it occurs as thin strips, it is tighter and brightly-colored at the center, lighter and porous on the (read full)

Jet Lignite

Jet Lignite: Jet is an organic gem material composed of lignite, and is a bituminous coal which can be polished. It is compact, homogeneous, has a hard, glossy surface and black interior variety of fossilized lignite or coal. It is an opaque black coalified fossilized drift wood from the coniferlike, 180 million years old 'Araucaria' or monkey puzzle tree that has been dried and fractured following death of (read full)


Serpentine: Serpentine may refer to a single mineral but more often to a group of minerals including antigorite, chrysotile, clinochrysotile, and lizardite, which are altered products of basic and ultra-basic rocks. Rock composed of these minerals is called serpentinite. It comes in all the hues of green.
In mineralogy, serpentine is divided into three polymorphs, crystals with the same chemical substanc (read full)


Spessartine: Spessartine is the manganese-aluminum variety of Garnet, belonging to its sub-group of aluminum garnets. Garnets are a group of silicate minerals that all crystallize in the isometric system and have the same chemical formula, but in a diversity of proportions, so garnets show up as different varieties, in a broad range of environments. Spessartine possesses the form typical of garnet crystals, w (read full)


Coral: Corals are the supporting framework of small polyps. Each coral polyp, a tiny marine animal that lives in enormous colonies, extracts calcium carbonate from the sea and exudes it through their bases to build a protective home around and above itself. Each generation of polyps dies in its protective home and each succeeding generation builds on top of its predecessor. They precipitate calcareous m (read full)


Zoisite: Zoisite is a hydrous calcium aluminum silicate in the Epidote group, with an orthorhombic crystal system, three crystal axes at right angles to each other, all of varying lengths. It appears in elongated, prismatic crystals, with fine parallel lines on the prism faces and usually poorly terminated. It also appears frequently in formless grains, poorly-defined crystals, rodlike aggregates and gran (read full)


Microcline: Microcline is a silicate of potassium and aluminum, and an alkali member of the feldspar group. It is the phase of this compound that is stable at low temperature. The feldspars are major constituents of the rocks on the earth's crust and comprise some of the most important rock-forming minerals. The four feldspars - orthoclase, sanidine, microcline and anorthoclase - comprise a group called the (read full)


Shell: Shell is the hard, protective, outer layer covering of certain creatures found in saltwater or freshwater, such as mollusks, snails, and turtles. This layer consists of calcium-carbonate and chitin, secreted by the soft tissue mantle of most mollusks. The inner surface of the shell is made from smooth nacre which covers the mantle.
Shell is used as inexpensive material for various purposes (read full)