Smoky Quartz is a mineral with a hardness of 7 out of 10 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness [?]. These Trigonally structured gems are made of silicon dioxide, their full chemical compound being SiO2.

Smoky or Brown Quartz is a commonly occurring quartz mineral that gets it's name from the smoky or cloudy interior.

A well polished piece of yellowish smoky quartz may appear like amber, while a well cut one may look similar to a brown tourmaline or andalusite.

With a Mohs hardness of 7 quartz in general is well suited for jewelry as it will hold a facet or edge fairly well.

Variations called Morion (black) and Cairngorm (smoky) have been found in large deposits throughout the world.

The specific gravity [?] for Smoky Quartz is 2.65, it's refractive index [?] is 1.54-1.55, and it's double refraction [?] is 0.009.

History

Smoky Quartz has been used as a healing stone, and in many rituals throughout the ages. It has been thought by many to contain mystical properties.

Quartz has been used to make arrow and spear heads in the ancient past.

Industrial Usages

Quartz is used to create silicone chips in wafer form. Quartz is used in glass making.

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Terms

Double Refraction or dr is the ability of a mineral to separate a refracted ray of light into 2 rays. If held over an image or text it will display the object 2x its original size.

Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness is the standard used to categorize a mineral's ability to resist scratching. It gets its name from Friedrich Mohs, the German geologist who first created the scale.

RI or Refractive Index defines light's ability to move through the mineral or in a general sense, any material.

SG or Specific Gravity is the ratio of the weight of any substance to that of pure water at temperature of 3.98°C(39.2°F) and standard atmospheric pressure. This is important to note when actively seeking these minerals in the wild. Minerals with a higher SG will settle below material with a lower sg over time.