Quartz Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Quartz gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.

Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz: Smoky or Brown Quartz is a commonly occurring quartz mineral that gets it's name from the smoky or cloudy interior. A well polished piece of yellowish smoky quartz may appear like amber, while a well cut one may look similar to a brown tourmaline or andalusite. With a Mohs hardness of 7 quartz in general is well suited for jewelry as it will hold a facet or edge fairly well. Variations called (read full)

Milky Quartz

Milky Quartz: Milky Quartz is a milky white translucent to opaque variety of crystalline quartz of somewhat greasy luster. It is the commonest variety found in pegmatites and hydrothermal veins. The color is generally caused by numerous bubbles of gas and liquid in the crystal. The milky color is caused by small cavities filled with numerous small fluids and CO2 in liquid condition. It is used as a gemstone, a (read full)

Rose Quartz

Rose Quartz: Rose quartz is a usually cloudy, translucent, delicate pale pink, deep pink, rose-red to quasi-white and often veined variety of Quartz. Also known as pink quartz , rose quartz may occur more often as anhedral masses or rarely as crystals which often reach quite large sizes. Rose quartz almost always occurs in pegmatites in massive crystalline bodies which do not show crystal faces. These larg (read full)

Aventurine

Aventurine: Aventurine is a quartz mineral that is most often used to crave ornate animal or spiritual figures. Aventurescence is a term used to describe the shimmering of this stone that is caused by mica inclusions. The color is almost always green, however sometimes it is blue, or green with hints of blue, or brown. Aventurine is ideal for the carving of figures, but not the best material in the world for (read full)

Chatoyant Quartz

Chatoyant Quartz: When quartz contains similarly-oriented fibrous inclusions, and is then appropriately-cut, in cabochon, curved stones display what is known as chatoyancy, meaning 'like a cat's eye.' The result is a series of minor gemstones differing only in their ground color and the mobile reflection. Comes in colors white, gray, green, yellow, brown. When the ground color is greenish-gray or green, the gem (read full)

Amethyst

Amethyst: Amethyst is the most coveted stone in the quartz group, and it is sometimes confused with beryl. It is usually found layered with milky quartz, and its color varies from purple to violet. It is sometimes sold as Ametrine, but this is actually a combined variation of 2 gems; Amethyst and Citrine. Amethyst like Agate Chalcedony can be found in geodes. There are many types of synthetic Amethyst aro (read full)

Phenakite

Phenakite: Phenakite is a rare beryllium silicate with a hexagonal crystal system. It an attractive hard mineral that resembles quartz. It appears as white or colorless rhombohedral crystals or stubby prisms terminated by multiple rhombohedral faces. Twinned crystals are also common. It may be colorless, yellow, pink, or brown. There are occasional chatoyant specimens, and four-rayed star stones with a brow (read full)

Citrine

Citrine: Citrine is an attractive type of quartz, which is the commonest mineral on the earth's surface. But citrine itself is an uncommon macrocrystalline variety. Its yellow color brought about by its iron hydrate content, its reddish yellow from a trace of ferric iron. It forms hexagonal prisms, terminated by pyramidal shapes. Its faces are often striated, and the crystals twinned and distorted, having (read full)

Axinite

Axinite: Axinite is a honey brownish to dark brown gem that is named after the axe head like crystal structures that are usually found. It is usually found in and around granite deposits, and is often mistaken (and sometimes sold by mistake) as smokey quartz. The gem is piezoelectric and because of this has been used to remove hair and lint from unwanted objects. A negative side effect of this is that it (read full)

Hambergite

Hambergite: Hambergite is a beryllium borate mineral in the classification of Nitrates, Carbonates, and Borates and is an extremely rare gemstone. It occurs as transparent colourless orthorhombic prismatic crystals which are usually well crystallized, sometimes twinned. Its colors range to white, white grayish, and yellowish white. Crystals are striated along the prisms. It is very hard and has one directi (read full)

Chrysoprase

Chrysoprase: Chrysoprase is a massive, translucent, dull leek-green to yellow-green compact quartz aggregate, a variety of chalcedony. It is a crystalline quartz leek-green in color containing swarm of green hair-like fibers amphibole actinolite, which is responsible for green color. Its color is caused by fibrous ferrohornblende aggregates or disseminated chlorite minerals. The stone is more translucent than (read full)

Dumortierite

Dumortierite: Dumortierite is a variety of gemstone of basic aluminum borosilicate with an orthorhombic crystal system. It appears usually in columnar or fibrous, radiating aggregates, sometimes reddish brown, dark blue, violet-blue. On the rare occasions that dumortierite forms crystals, they are prismatic. Faceted or prismatic blue or violet samples are rare, due to scarcity of individual crystals. It is (read full)

Rutile

Rutile: Rutile with anatase and brookite is a trimorph of titanium oxide in the Rutile group.
It forms characteristic slender prismatic striated lengthways, variably terminated and often geniculate twinned crystals of the tetragonal system. Elbow- and heart-shaped (geniculated) twin crystals are common. It is hard, heavy, fragile, with perfect cleavage. It has a metallic to adamantine lustre an (read full)

Rock Crystal (Quartz)

Rock Crystal (Quartz): Rock Crystal is the purest water-clear and colorless from of Quartz. It is known as mountain crystal (Bergkristall). It is the presence of impurities that gives other varieties of quartz their colors. It is found in beautifully formed crystals, often with complex terminations. These are usully bounded by the faces of six-sided prisms, which are almost always striated horizontally. Very often they (read full)

Sard

Sard: Sard is the uniformly colored red-brown or brownish-yellow variety of Chalcedony, which in turn is a microcrystalline variety of Quartz. There is no strict separation between sard and cornelian/carnelian (red to reddish brown), because they are both chalcedonies found in the same deposits and were employed for the same objects. The tints of a sard stone may be reddish or orange. Good-quality mat (read full)

Chalcedony

Chalcedony: Chalcedony is a compact form of silica, composed of microscopic quartz crystals. It is softer than quartz and denser than opal. Its appearance may range from transparent to translucent to opaque. The main types are chalcedony, which is uniformly colored, and agate, which has curved bands or zones of varying color. Varieties include the red to reddish brown, translucent carnelian, the red, opaqu (read full)

Iolite

Iolite: Iolite is the violet-colored variety of Cordierite (named after French geologist P. Cordier), a silicate of aluminum and magnesium, with an orthorhombic crystal system. Though the name cordierite is used by mineralogists, the name iolite has become established among gemologists. It appears as stubby, prismatic crystals, pesudo-hexagonal twins with a glassy appearance. It is frequently microgranul (read full)

Petalite

Petalite: Petalite is a lithium aluminum silicate that is an important ore of lithium. This mineral forms, rarely, as small crystals, which are commonly twinned. More often, petalite forms as large, cleavable masses. It may be white, grey, pinkish, yellow, or colorless. It is transparent to translucent, with a vitreous to pearly luster, and fuses with difficulty. It forms in very coarse-grained, acid igne (read full)

Carnelian

Carnelian: Carnelian is a variety of chalcedony, which is translucent and is red to reddish-brown. It may also occur as flesh-colored chalcedony, known as cornelian or carnelian. It is slightly similar in appearance to its relation, the dark brown chalcedony, sard. The colour of cornelian is caused by colloidally dispersed hematite. Other reddish chalcedonies may have been colored by heating since if they (read full)

Plasma Chalcedony

Plasma Chalcedony: Plasma is a massive, semitransparent, leek to dark green variety of Chalcedony (a microcrystalline variety of the Quartz group), microgranular or microfibrous, consisting of speckles of red or brownish-red jasper, resembling drops of blood. It is translucent to opaque, may be dark green to bright-green, apple-green, or nearly emerald-green, containing microfibrous of actinolite, frequently fleck (read full)

Lazulite

Lazulite: Lazulite is a compact, pleochroitic mineral which forms a series to scorzalite. It is dichroic, with a monoclinic crystal system. It appears as pointed, pseudo-dipyramidal, bright blue crystals in microgranular masses. It is hard, medium heavy, fragile with indistinct prismatic cleavage. It is translucent, with vitreous luster. It is infusible, discolors and breaks into small fragments when heat (read full)

Sillimanite

Sillimanite: Sillimanite is a grayish-blue aluminum silicate with an orthorhombic crystal system. It is trimorphic with andalusite and kyanite. All three have the same chemical compound but their atoms each arrange to create three different crystal forms. It appears as long, slender crystals without distinct terminations, in off-white, gray, brown, pale green, slate-blue, blue-green, and these crystals are of (read full)

Jasper Chalcedony

Jasper Chalcedony: Jasper is the opaque form of Chalcedony, the microcrystalline varieties of quartz that form concretionary deposits, partially of organic origin in the case of jasper. It is commonly microscopically fibrous, massive, and has a nearly wax-like luster. It has a lower density than ordinary quartz. It is the archetypal collectable beach pebble, dense, fine crystalline, translucent to opaque, and cons (read full)

Goshenite Beryl

Goshenite Beryl: Goshenite is a colorless sodium-rich gem variety of Beryl, a group which includes Emerald and Aquamarine. Other gem beryls include Heliodor and Morganite. It also appears are pale-green, apple-green, to bluish. All beryls are resistant to chemicals with the exception of fluoric acid. They are brittle and therefore easily damaged by knocks, have a vitreous luster, and occur with aquamarine. Their (read full)

Chrysoprase

Chrysoprase: Chrysoprase is a variety of chalcedony, usually black or leek-green in color. The most highly-prized variation comes in bright-green, apple- or leek-green. It has a waxy lustre. It occurs as mammillary or botryoidal masses. The microscopic quartz fibers have a radial structure. The pigment is nickel. Large broken pieces are often full of fissures with irregular colors. Its color can fade in sun (read full)

Sardonyx

Sardonyx: Sardonyx is a gem variety of reddish-brown colored sard with white or black banded chalcedony or onyx, used to make cameo with the raised black, red, or brown background. It is an example of a layer stone subvariety of Chalcedony, which in turn is a cryptocrystalline variety of Quartz.
Layer stones are multi-layered materials used in the art of gem-carving and engraving, also called glyptog (read full)

Cassiterite

Cassiterite: Cassiterite may form as short or slender prismatic, or bipyramidal, elbow-shaped crystals. It has a crystal surface reflecting light as in a mirror. They may occur as massive, granular, botryoidal, and reniform. When found in granular, banded, fibrous masses, it looks like wood. When found in groups of large bright crystals, it is usually called "diamond tin." A red variety cut for collectors is k (read full)

Schorl Tourmaline

Schorl Tourmaline: Schorl is the black, opaque, sodium iron rich variety of Tourmaline, a complex borosilicate with a trigonal crystal system.
Tourmalines usually occur as long, three-sided prisms, which often have well-terminated ends. Sometimes they are found as parallel or radiating groups of long, thin prisms with striated ridges lining its surface. Its varieties span the widest color ranges in the mineral (read full)

Calcite

Calcite: Of all minerals, calcite is by far the richest in forms. It appears as rhombohedral, scalenohedral, or prismatic crystals, often intergrown or twinned. It occurs in masses, colorless or in white, pink, green, or yellow, and often visibly thermoluminescent (emits light when heated). Like quartz, calcite often has twinned structure caused by temperature and stress changes. It is semi-hard, wit (read full)

Onyx

Onyx: Onyx is a translucent to semitransparent variety of Agate, which in turn is a variety of Chalcedony or cryptocrystalline quartz that is porous and consists of straight or parallel banded agate of alternating shades of milky white and black, gray and black, black and red, white and red, white and brown. The term onyx has been erroneously applied as a suffix to Brazilian onyx, Mexican onyx, Orient (read full)

Microcline

Microcline: Microcline is a silicate of potassium and aluminum, and an alkali member of the feldspar group. It is the phase of this compound that is stable at low temperature. The feldspars are major constituents of the rocks on the earth's crust and comprise some of the most important rock-forming minerals. The four feldspars - orthoclase, sanidine, microcline and anorthoclase - comprise a group called the (read full)

Gold

Gold: Gold is a Native Element that appears in very rare, small, octahedral, cubic, and dodecahedral crystals. It normally occurs in very small, shapeless grains, sheets, and flakes. Dendrites are rare. Nuggets are common in alluvial or glacial deposits. It is of yellow color, varying in brightness, depending on the impurities present. This bright, rich yellow is resistant to tarnishing. Gold is often (read full)

Kyanite

Kyanite: Kyanite is an aluminum silicate that occurs as elongated and tabular in groups of light-blue crystals darker toward the center, or flat, bladed crystals in schists and gneisses, or as radiating rosettes in quartz. It is trimorphous with sillimanite and andalusite. Kyanite is also known as disthene, meaning, "double strength." This refers to the fact that the hardness along the length of kyanite c (read full)

Scheelite

Scheelite: Scheelite is a mineral in the group of Sulfates, Chromates, Molybdates, Tungstates. It has the same crystal structure and outside appearance as powellite. But scheelite is a calcium-tungstate, while powellite is a calcium-molybdate.

In rocks, scheelite may appear as crystals like two pyramids connected at its bases, or pseudo-octahedral, or having table-like faces, with detectable p (read full)

Pyrite

Pyrite: Pyrite is an iron sulphide mineral with a cubic crystal system and is dimorphous with marcasite. It occurs as cubic crystals with striated faces, or in the form of pentagonal dodecahedra, usually well-crystallized, either isolated or in small, often well-formed groups, or as "iron cross" twins. It is a characteristic, brassy-yellow or pale-gold color, opaque and with a metal luster. It sometimes (read full)

Oligoclase

Oligoclase: Oligoclase is a mineral of the plagioclase feldspar series, other members of which are Labradorite and Anorthite. It forms as tabular crystals, which are commonly twinned, with parallel or criss-cross twinning striations. It appears as massive, granular, or compact. It may show brilliant reflections from inclusions. It is light, transparent to translucent, with a vitreous luster and may come in (read full)

Opal

Opal: Opal is hydrated silicon dioxide. It has the same chemical composition as quartz but contains about one-tenth (and sometimes as much as one-third) water. It is never crystalline, but it displays a rich play of colors, or "fire" caused by the internal refraction of light by the array of tiny spheres of amorphous silica which for a compact, three-dimensional network in the mineral. It may be somew (read full)

Spodumene

Spodumene: Spodumene is a lithium aluminum silicate that crystallizes in the monoclinic system. It is one of several rock-forming minerals in the Pyroxene group, which are physically-related as their chemical content is quite similar and forms a chain. Fellow pyroxenes are jadeite, enstatite, diopside, hypersthene, augite, acmite, hedenbergite, pigeonite, and aegirineaugite. It appears as prismatic crystals (read full)

Fluorite

Fluorite: Fluorite is a widely-distributed mineral in the Halide classification, and is now mined in vast quantities. It is a suitable mineral for collectors and is rarely cut as a gem, but massive varieties are carved as ornamental objects. It appears in cubes, octahedrons, dodecahedrons, while other forms are rarer. Compact, banded, and concretionary masses are frequently found. Most fine crystals of flu (read full)

Tektites

Tektites: Tektites are glass specimens rich in silica that many believed were actually meteorites. But, the locations in which tektites have been found, and their chemistry, led scientists to suggest that they may not in fact have come from outside planet Earth. Another conjecture is that tektites are formed from rocks that melted after being hit by a meteorite. Tektites actually have a composition not unl (read full)

Moonstone

Moonstone: The variety name Moonstone is usually used to describe an optical effect and unlike most variety names it is not confined to a single species (The term is also applied to albite-moonstone, microcline-moonstone, labradorite-moonstone). But Moonstone most prominently refers to the orthoclase feldspar, Adularia Moonstone, a microperthitic association of orthoclase and albite) and rarely to Albite M (read full)

Topaz

Topaz: The transparent, colored crystals, which also have good luster, are widely used as gems.
Topaz is a silicate of aluminum containing fluorine and hydroxyl which occurs in a variety of delicate colors, nicely added by impurities. It is often found in short to long crystal prisms with pyramid-shaped ends, or just clean finished edges. It is often white, semiopaque, milky, or a faded yellow, (read full)