Soft Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Soft gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.

Brazilianite

Brazilianite: Brazilianite is a soft and brittle mineral that in general does work very well as a gemstone. It's soft at 5.5 Mohs, and so it will quickly either shear apart, or crumble at the edges. As one might guess Brazilianite was first discovered in Brazil. It tends to be a yellow or light yellowish green mineral. This mineral has also been found in New Hampshire, United States. The mineral is so rare it (read full)

Azurite

Azurite: Azurite is a gorgeous stone that when polished into a sphere may look very much like the planet earth. It's blues, and greens look like oceans and forests. It gets its name from the bluish color. The word azure means bluish purple in Old French and Middle English. In Spanish azul is blue. This gem is usually only polished as it is very soft, and can not hold a facet well. (4 out of 10 on the Moh (read full)

Andradite

Andradite: Andradite is a name given to members of the garnet that contain manganese and titanium. The 3 types Andradite are..1.)Demantoid, 2.)Melanite, and 3.) Topazolite Demantoid-the word means diamond like. It is yellow green to green in color and is the most valuable of the 3 types. Demantoid is soft enough that older gems will have facet edges that are slightly worn. Largest deposits (read full)

Meerschaum

Meerschaum: Meerschaum is a clay-like hydrous magnesium silicate. It has no crystals, and occurs as earthy aggregates, porcellanous masses, nodular, and porous. In the fresh state it is soapy and soft, but hard when dried. It sticks to the tongue and its taste sets the teeth on edge. It is opaque, has flat conchoidal, earthy fracture, and an orthorhombic microcrystalline system. Because of its high porosity (read full)

Barite

Barite: Barite also called Baryte or heavy spar is a clear to yellowish to blue mineral that is very soft and not well suited for making of gemstones. (Its a 3 on the harness scale). Its found near lead-zinc mines within limestone deposits. All in all a nice item for a collector, but in terms of long term jewelry this is not a very suitable gem for rings, and necklaces as it will break and shear apart wh (read full)

Anglesite

Anglesite: Anglesite is a very soft gem just slightly harder than gold and silver and as such it does not hold facets well/cut easily. Because of its softness it tends to scratch, and these scratches will take away from the value and appearance of this gem. Once cut this gem will not do well in rings as it will quickly become scratched and its edges worn round. This gem is usually colorless or clear, but (read full)

Silver

Silver: Silver is a Native Element with an isometric system, a soft, white, precious metallic element of group 1 of the Periodic System with the symbol Ag. It appears as cubes, octahedrons, and dodecahedrons, and rarely as crystals. Native silver cubes are always small, usually displaying stepped faces, or in compact masses of twining branches, and wirelike forms of a silvery, gray-white color. Aggregate (read full)

Serpentine

Serpentine: Serpentine may refer to a single mineral but more often to a group of minerals including antigorite, chrysotile, clinochrysotile, and lizardite, which are altered products of basic and ultra-basic rocks. Rock composed of these minerals is called serpentinite. It comes in all the hues of green.
In mineralogy, serpentine is divided into three polymorphs, crystals with the same chemical substanc (read full)

Coral

Coral: Corals are the supporting framework of small polyps. Each coral polyp, a tiny marine animal that lives in enormous colonies, extracts calcium carbonate from the sea and exudes it through their bases to build a protective home around and above itself. Each generation of polyps dies in its protective home and each succeeding generation builds on top of its predecessor. They precipitate calcareous m (read full)

Morganite

Morganite: Morganite is a pale red-purple, rose, salmon to purplish red, slightly pink, cesium-bearing variety of Beryl. The Beryl group of silicates includes the important gem varieties emerald, blue aquamarine, pink morganite, and red and yellow beryl. The color of morganite is usually a soft pink without any overtones. It has glassy luster, like other beryls, but its pleochroism is not noticeable. The p (read full)

Gold

Gold: Gold is a Native Element that appears in very rare, small, octahedral, cubic, and dodecahedral crystals. It normally occurs in very small, shapeless grains, sheets, and flakes. Dendrites are rare. Nuggets are common in alluvial or glacial deposits. It is of yellow color, varying in brightness, depending on the impurities present. This bright, rich yellow is resistant to tarnishing. Gold is often (read full)

Titanite

Titanite: Titanite is a very rare calcium titanium silicate that is an important ore of titanium. It is also called Sphene. Its crystals are very rare, brilliant, and sparkles like diamond. It appears as crystals that are prisms with pyramid tips, or stubby, wedge-shaped, flattened crystals, or tabular and platy. There are also titanite crystal twins that have grown side by side or interpenetrated, or in g (read full)

Gypsum

Gypsum: Gypsum is the most common sulphate mineral. It is usually the first evaporite mineral to be precipitated form water due to its poor solubility. Varieties include Selenite (or "spectacle stone), which is colorless and transparent; Satin Spar, the fibrous, translucent form with silky luster, which when cut cabochon shows pearly chatoyant effects; Alabaster, used for ornaments, which is firm, fine-gr (read full)

Sapphire

Sapphire: Sapphire is the blue variety of Corundum. Sapphires can be a very dark blue, to the point of seeming dense and blackish from a distance, sometimes accompanied by a blue to dull green pleochroism, which is only visible from the side in cut stones. They may also be a strong, but not too bright blue, easily recognizable from a distance, this being the real color. Other possibilities are light, usual (read full)

Emerald

Emerald: Emerald is the most prized variety of the mineral Beryl. It sometimes fetches higher prices than diamond. It appears as pale green to bright green. Though it is the green variety of beryl, not all gem-quality green beryls are called emeralds; yellow-green stones are called "heliodors;"soft blue-green or even pale green specimens are called "aquamarines." The typical color of emerald is a bea (read full)

Zircon

Zircon: Zircon is a zirconium silicate with a tetragonal crystal system, and also contains thorium and uranium. It appears as stubby, prismatic, isolated or sometimes dipyramidal, like two pyramids connected at their bases; or in twins, colorless to yellow, red, brown, gray or green, in irregular granules. It is very hard, heavy, with indistinct cleavage, and shell-like fracture. It is sometimes perfect (read full)

Shell

Shell: Shell is the hard, protective, outer layer covering of certain creatures found in saltwater or freshwater, such as mollusks, snails, and turtles. This layer consists of calcium-carbonate and chitin, secreted by the soft tissue mantle of most mollusks. The inner surface of the shell is made from smooth nacre which covers the mantle.
Shell is used as inexpensive material for various purposes (read full)