Water Clear Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Water Clear gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.

Achroite Tourmaline

Achroite Tourmaline: Colorless Tourmaline, also known as white or Achroite Tourmaline is the name given to the clear or colorless version of Tourmaline. The word achroite is Greek for colorless. If you are into birthstones then Achroite Tourmaline is one of the ones used for October. If you follow the zodiac then it's used to represent Libra. Tourmaline in general is found on every continent and is possibly the (read full)

Rock Crystal (Quartz)

Rock Crystal (Quartz): Rock Crystal is the purest water-clear and colorless from of Quartz. It is known as mountain crystal (Bergkristall). It is the presence of impurities that gives other varieties of quartz their colors. It is found in beautifully formed crystals, often with complex terminations. These are usully bounded by the faces of six-sided prisms, which are almost always striated horizontally. Very often they (read full)

Barite

Barite: Barite also called Baryte or heavy spar is a clear to yellowish to blue mineral that is very soft and not well suited for making of gemstones. (Its a 3 on the harness scale). Its found near lead-zinc mines within limestone deposits. All in all a nice item for a collector, but in terms of long term jewelry this is not a very suitable gem for rings, and necklaces as it will break and shear apart wh (read full)

Beryllonite

Beryllonite: Beryllonite is a clear gem/mineral that gets its name from its high content of beryllium. There are very few gem quality pieces that have been produced. Beryllonite can be found in Pakistan, Brazil, Finland, and Maine. It has a color streak of white, and a vitreous luster. (read full)

Anglesite

Anglesite: Anglesite is a very soft gem just slightly harder than gold and silver and as such it does not hold facets well/cut easily. Because of its softness it tends to scratch, and these scratches will take away from the value and appearance of this gem. Once cut this gem will not do well in rings as it will quickly become scratched and its edges worn round. This gem is usually colorless or clear, but (read full)

Celestine

Celestine: Celestine appears as colorless, or pale blue, and is transparent to translucent, and has two directions of cleavage. It is very brittle, and has a vitreous to pearly luster. It occurs in sediments associated with sulfur, with evaporate minerals like gypsum, anhydrite, and halite; in hydrothermal veins with galena and sphalerite; as concretions in clay and marl; in cavities in basic lavas, and i (read full)

Amblygonite

Amblygonite: Amblygonite is a not so popular gem whose greek name means crooked. It comes in green, clear, yellow, and even purple. Older cut specimens may have slightly rounded facet edges due to the gems lack hardness (6 of 10). Amblygonite can be found in Brazil, France, the United States, Burma, and even Sweden. It may be confused easily with Brazilianite. (read full)

Aragonite

Aragonite: Aragonite is made from calcium carbonate and found near sedimentary rocks. Colors include clear (when free from impurities), yellow, blue, and even pink. Aragonite can be found in Turkey, France, United States,the bahamas and many other places around the world. Aragonite sand isn't necessarily mined but rather gathered from locations in and around reef systems. This sand is then stored and pack (read full)

Gypsum

Gypsum: Gypsum is the most common sulphate mineral. It is usually the first evaporite mineral to be precipitated form water due to its poor solubility. Varieties include Selenite (or "spectacle stone), which is colorless and transparent; Satin Spar, the fibrous, translucent form with silky luster, which when cut cabochon shows pearly chatoyant effects; Alabaster, used for ornaments, which is firm, fine-gr (read full)

Apatite

Apatite: Apatite is a gemstone that appears similar to tourmaline in its blue green form. It comes in yellow, green, pink, purple, violet, clear, and cat's eye. The most popular and valuable versions of Apatite are currently the blues that look like tourmaline. In fact its Greek name means "cheat" because it's often passed for other more valuable gems. Apatite streaks white to white yellow. The light gre (read full)

Obsidian

Obsidian: Obsidian is an extrusive igneous rock, a volcanic glass formed by rapid cooling. Its essential component is glass. Its accessory components are magnetite, ilmenite, oxides and other minerals, such as feldspar. It has the same composition as dacite or rhyolite, with less than 1 percent water. Its color is shiny black, with clear conchoidal (shell-like)fracture, its texture glassy with rare micr (read full)

Meerschaum

Meerschaum: Meerschaum is a clay-like hydrous magnesium silicate. It has no crystals, and occurs as earthy aggregates, porcellanous masses, nodular, and porous. In the fresh state it is soapy and soft, but hard when dried. It sticks to the tongue and its taste sets the teeth on edge. It is opaque, has flat conchoidal, earthy fracture, and an orthorhombic microcrystalline system. Because of its high porosity (read full)

Cerussite

Cerussite: Cerussite is a colorless carbonate of the aragonite mineralogical classification. It appears as colorless or white crystals with grayish tints, elongated and generally twinned to form a reticulated network with 60-degree angles, as stubby, tabular crystals in star- or heart-shaped twins. It can also be grey, greenish, or blue as a result of inclusions, such as lead, or copper. Impure cerussite is (read full)

Danburite

Danburite: Danburite is a silicate of clear, prismatic crystals, with wedge-shaped terminations. It is occasionally pale yellow, a variety of gemstone feldspars group that resembles topaz. It is very hard, heavy, and has a transparent to vitreous to greasy luster. It fuses easily into a colorless glass, coloring the flame green, has a luminescence that is sky blue to pale blue-green, and also shows red therm (read full)

Opal

Opal: Opal is hydrated silicon dioxide. It has the same chemical composition as quartz but contains about one-tenth (and sometimes as much as one-third) water. It is never crystalline, but it displays a rich play of colors, or "fire" caused by the internal refraction of light by the array of tiny spheres of amorphous silica which for a compact, three-dimensional network in the mineral. It may be somew (read full)

Albite

Albite: Albite is a member of the feldspar species as is predominantly a white or whitish mineral. A fine Albite gem will be colorless (mostly), or colored similar to moonstone. Some of the better specimens have been found in upper North America including the United States and Canada In 1815 Albite was given the Latin name albus which literally means white. Albite astrological sign is that of A (read full)

Benitoite

Benitoite: Benitoite is a rare gemstone / mineral that fluoresces when lit by black lights. It gets its name from San Benito County, California where it was first found. This gem is almost always blue (it was originally thought to be a sapphire) but also has variations in purple, pink, and clear. Gem prices seem to fluctuate but a few hundred dollars per half ct is common. Why so expensive? The quality gem (read full)

Amber

Amber: Amber is one of the few organic gemstones that exist. Amber is made when tree resin is fossilized. Most people I speak with directly think that its sap, but this is not the case. The word sap and resin are used almost interchangeably but there are a few differences. Sap is the sugar and water mixture found in trees, while resin is the liquid that oozes from cuts in the trees outer shell. Due to i (read full)

Sinhalite

Sinhalite: Sinhalite is a magnesium aluminum borate, and is most commonly found as transparent honey-yellow to brown grains or pebbles with an orthorhombic crystal system. It also appears as pale yellowish, yellow, brown, greenish-brown to black. It occurs in contact metamorphic rocks that are rich in boron, among gneiss or granite where limestones are being replaced through contact with magmatic rock. But (read full)

Sard

Sard: Sard is the uniformly colored red-brown or brownish-yellow variety of Chalcedony, which in turn is a microcrystalline variety of Quartz. There is no strict separation between sard and cornelian/carnelian (red to reddish brown), because they are both chalcedonies found in the same deposits and were employed for the same objects. The tints of a sard stone may be reddish or orange. Good-quality mat (read full)

Aquamarine

Aquamarine: Aquamarine is a form Beryl that is similar in color to sea water. So it varies from green to blue just like the oceans. Most if not all Aquamarine has been heat treated to improve or lighten the color. Currently the most popular and therefore valuable colors of Aquamarine Beryl are the light "sky" blue versions. If Aquamarine receives large amounts of heat treatment it will bleach or be (read full)

Phosphophyllite

Phosphophyllite: Phosphophyllite is a very rare mineral, a hydrated zinc iron manganese phosphate with a monoclinic crystal system. It appears as long prismatic or thick tabular crystals. It is colorless to deep bluish-green. Polysynthetic twinned crystals are common. It is semi-hard, light, with excellent prismatic cleavage. Translucent to transparent with vitreous luster. It turns gray and loses water when hea (read full)

Aventurine

Aventurine: Aventurine is a quartz mineral that is most often used to crave ornate animal or spiritual figures. Aventurescence is a term used to describe the shimmering of this stone that is caused by mica inclusions. The color is almost always green, however sometimes it is blue, or green with hints of blue, or brown. Aventurine is ideal for the carving of figures, but not the best material in the world for (read full)

Pearl

Pearl: Pearl is one of four main ornamental materials that are classified as "organic" gems, the other three being coral, ivory, and amber. About 92 percent of pearl is calcium carbonate, in the form of aragonite crystals, held together by an organic substance (concholin), which is identical to the horny outer layer of oyster shells, plus a small quantity of water. Mother-of-pearl has a simila (read full)

Milky Quartz

Milky Quartz: Milky Quartz is a milky white translucent to opaque variety of crystalline quartz of somewhat greasy luster. It is the commonest variety found in pegmatites and hydrothermal veins. The color is generally caused by numerous bubbles of gas and liquid in the crystal. The milky color is caused by small cavities filled with numerous small fluids and CO2 in liquid condition. It is used as a gemstone, a (read full)

Moonstone

Moonstone: The variety name Moonstone is usually used to describe an optical effect and unlike most variety names it is not confined to a single species (The term is also applied to albite-moonstone, microcline-moonstone, labradorite-moonstone). But Moonstone most prominently refers to the orthoclase feldspar, Adularia Moonstone, a microperthitic association of orthoclase and albite) and rarely to Albite M (read full)

Indicolite

Indicolite: Indicolite is the blue sodium-rich variety of Tourmaline, and may come in all shades of blue, from light-blue, violet-blue to deep red or deep green. It generally appears quite a deep blue, even the color of dark blue ink, perhaps appearing green in one direction because of its strong pleochroism. Sometimes indicolite is an overall greenish blue, which, unlike the color of greenish blue sapphire, (read full)

Iolite

Iolite: Iolite is the violet-colored variety of Cordierite (named after French geologist P. Cordier), a silicate of aluminum and magnesium, with an orthorhombic crystal system. Though the name cordierite is used by mineralogists, the name iolite has become established among gemologists. It appears as stubby, prismatic crystals, pesudo-hexagonal twins with a glassy appearance. It is frequently microgranul (read full)

Orthoclase

Orthoclase: Orthoclase mineral is a silicate of potassium and aluminum, belonging to the Feldspar group. It has the same composition as microcline, but is stable at slightly higher temperatures. It occurs as prismatic, sometimes flat-sided crystals, but in rocks it is usually anhedral. It may be perfectly transparent and yellow or almost colorless, but it is more often semi-opaque and white to grayish-white, (read full)

Topaz

Topaz: The transparent, colored crystals, which also have good luster, are widely used as gems.
Topaz is a silicate of aluminum containing fluorine and hydroxyl which occurs in a variety of delicate colors, nicely added by impurities. It is often found in short to long crystal prisms with pyramid-shaped ends, or just clean finished edges. It is often white, semiopaque, milky, or a faded yellow, (read full)

Turquoise

Turquoise: Turquoise is a hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminum in the Phosphates, Arsenates, Vanadates group, with a triclinic crystal system. It rarely occurs as prismatic crystals. It is usually found as light-blue or green masses, nodules, and veins, sometimes filling cavities in various rocks. When it occurs as thin strips, it is tighter and brightly-colored at the center, lighter and porous on the (read full)

Sillimanite

Sillimanite: Sillimanite is a grayish-blue aluminum silicate with an orthorhombic crystal system. It is trimorphic with andalusite and kyanite. All three have the same chemical compound but their atoms each arrange to create three different crystal forms. It appears as long, slender crystals without distinct terminations, in off-white, gray, brown, pale green, slate-blue, blue-green, and these crystals are of (read full)

Malachite

Malachite: Malachite is a bright green, basic copper carbonate. It appears as fibrous, radiating aggregates with silky to dull luster, and its crystals are adamantine. Acicular crystals are common. It commonly occurs as a green film on other copper minerals and as botryoidal or reniform masses with concretionary, banded structure and emerald green color. The color of the glassy, lustrous crystals is dark (read full)

Hessonite

Hessonite: Hessonite is the brown-orange variety of Grossular, a nesosilicate in the Garnet group, with an isometric crystal system. It appears with dodecahedral or trapezohedral crystals, cinnamon-brown to orange because of its iron content. Its color matches that of the oil of cinnamon. It also appears as golden-yellow, yellow-brown, or reddish-brown. It is very hard, heavy, fragile, has no cleavage. It (read full)

Fluorite

Fluorite: Fluorite is a widely-distributed mineral in the Halide classification, and is now mined in vast quantities. It is a suitable mineral for collectors and is rarely cut as a gem, but massive varieties are carved as ornamental objects. It appears in cubes, octahedrons, dodecahedrons, while other forms are rarer. Compact, banded, and concretionary masses are frequently found. Most fine crystals of flu (read full)

Tektites

Tektites: Tektites are glass specimens rich in silica that many believed were actually meteorites. But, the locations in which tektites have been found, and their chemistry, led scientists to suggest that they may not in fact have come from outside planet Earth. Another conjecture is that tektites are formed from rocks that melted after being hit by a meteorite. Tektites actually have a composition not unl (read full)

Sodalite

Sodalite: Sodalite is a sodium aluminum silicate chloride in the Sodalite group with an isometric crystal system. Its royal blue forms are the best known. As a mineral, it is a principal component of lapis lazuli. It appears very rare as dodecahedrons, crystals with 12 faces, but usually it shows as compact masses, bright blue, white or gray with green tints. It is unsaturated and rarely appears with inclu (read full)

Spessartine

Spessartine: Spessartine is the manganese-aluminum variety of Garnet, belonging to its sub-group of aluminum garnets. Garnets are a group of silicate minerals that all crystallize in the isometric system and have the same chemical formula, but in a diversity of proportions, so garnets show up as different varieties, in a broad range of environments. Spessartine possesses the form typical of garnet crystals, w (read full)

Diopside

Diopside: Diopside is a type of Clinopyroxene, which are abundant, rock-forming minerals. These are embedded and surface-growing crystals, short columnar, and tabular, almost square or octagonal in cross section. It is the magnesium-bearing end member in the isomorphous, monoclinic diopside-hedenbergite series, a complete solid solution series in which two intermediate members, salite and ferrosalite, have (read full)

Grossular Garnet

Grossular Garnet: Grossular is a nesosilicate in the Garnet group, with an isometric crystal system. Together with uvarovite and andradite, the three are known as the "ugrandite garnets," an isomorphous series of calcium garnet minerals. It appears with dodecahedral or trapezohedral crystals of various colors; normally characterized by a green color, but also may be colorless, pale green or milky when pure, cinnam (read full)

Zoisite

Zoisite: Zoisite is a hydrous calcium aluminum silicate in the Epidote group, with an orthorhombic crystal system, three crystal axes at right angles to each other, all of varying lengths. It appears in elongated, prismatic crystals, with fine parallel lines on the prism faces and usually poorly terminated. It also appears frequently in formless grains, poorly-defined crystals, rodlike aggregates and gran (read full)