Yellowish Gemstones & Minerals

The following is a list of Yellowish gems and minerals listed in our database. Click the pictures to get full data, click the X to remove the gem from the list.

Plasma Chalcedony

Plasma Chalcedony: Plasma is a massive, semitransparent, leek to dark green variety of Chalcedony (a microcrystalline variety of the Quartz group), microgranular or microfibrous, consisting of speckles of red or brownish-red jasper, resembling drops of blood. It is translucent to opaque, may be dark green to bright-green, apple-green, or nearly emerald-green, containing microfibrous of actinolite, frequently fleck (read full)

Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz: Smoky or Brown Quartz is a commonly occurring quartz mineral that gets it's name from the smoky or cloudy interior. A well polished piece of yellowish smoky quartz may appear like amber, while a well cut one may look similar to a brown tourmaline or andalusite. With a Mohs hardness of 7 quartz in general is well suited for jewelry as it will hold a facet or edge fairly well. Variations called (read full)

Heliodor Beryl

Heliodor Beryl: Heliodor is a gem variety of Beryl with golden-yellow or light yellow-green color. In many cases heliodor is also used to include gems known as Golden beryl/ Golden emerald, though not to be confused with gold beryl. It is sometimes hard to establish a dividing line between heliodor and golden beryl. Its main characteristic is its color, which is the yellow-green of olive oil. Its pigment is uran (read full)

Barite

Barite: Barite also called Baryte or heavy spar is a clear to yellowish to blue mineral that is very soft and not well suited for making of gemstones. (Its a 3 on the harness scale). Its found near lead-zinc mines within limestone deposits. All in all a nice item for a collector, but in terms of long term jewelry this is not a very suitable gem for rings, and necklaces as it will break and shear apart wh (read full)

Kornerupine

Kornerupine: Kornerupine is a rare magnesium aluminum borate silicate which occurs as transparent prismatic crystals of the orthorhombic system. It is hard and a has good cleavage in one direction. Colours include a characteristic dark green leaning to brown and a rare and attractive bright vanadium green. This pleochroic colours are brown to greenish brown. Chatoyant stones show a bright eye against a dark g (read full)

Brazilianite

Brazilianite: Brazilianite is a soft and brittle mineral that in general does work very well as a gemstone. It's soft at 5.5 Mohs, and so it will quickly either shear apart, or crumble at the edges. As one might guess Brazilianite was first discovered in Brazil. It tends to be a yellow or light yellowish green mineral. This mineral has also been found in New Hampshire, United States. The mineral is so rare it (read full)

Epidote

Epidote: Epidote is widespread, forms a continuous series of minerals, ending with clinozoisite, which contains no iron. It occurs as crystals elongated and often striated parallel to length, and also as massive, fibrous, or granular habits. Epidote has a yellow-green color, ranges from yellowish-greenish to greenish-black. It has vitreous luster, and is transparent to nearly opaque. It has one perfe (read full)

Andalusite

Andalusite: The gem Andalusite is a gemstone composed of Lead Sulphate giving it a yellowish hew with a light tint of a rusty red color. Its named after the city Andalusia in Spain where it was first found. Colors generally vary from yellow, to yellow green, to green, to brownish red (more iron in the read hued versions), to purple, and even black. This gem is pleochroic meaning it changes color depending on (read full)

Staurolite

Staurolite: Staurolite is a hydrous magnesium aluminum silicate that crystallizes in the monoclinic system. It appears as coarse, dark gold-brown prisms, or sometimes reddish-brown to black stubby crystals. On weathered rock, it stands out in contrast like sand-coated yellowish brown prisms. Surfaces are often rough or covered with an earthy coating because of natural alteration. It frequently occurs in ch (read full)

Vesuvianite

Vesuvianite: Vesuvianite is a hydrous calcium magnesium aluminum silicate with a tetragonal crystal system. It is the preferred name used by mineralogists for all transparent varieties of Idocrase, the name used by gemmologists. It is a gem mineral that appears in diverse colors, and thus is prized by collectors. A compact green variety of vesuvianite that looks like jade is known as californite. A greenish-b (read full)

Enstatite

Enstatite: Enstatite is the most common silicate under the Orthopyroxene group in the larger classification of Pyroxene minerals (which are rock-forming silicates). Orthopyroxenes form a chemical series composed of the magnesium-rich enstatite, and the iron-containing bronzite and hypersthene. It has an orthorhombic crystal system and appears rarely as stubby, prismatic crystals, but more commonly in fibr (read full)

Sinhalite

Sinhalite: Sinhalite is a magnesium aluminum borate, and is most commonly found as transparent honey-yellow to brown grains or pebbles with an orthorhombic crystal system. It also appears as pale yellowish, yellow, brown, greenish-brown to black. It occurs in contact metamorphic rocks that are rich in boron, among gneiss or granite where limestones are being replaced through contact with magmatic rock. But (read full)

Hambergite

Hambergite: Hambergite is a beryllium borate mineral in the classification of Nitrates, Carbonates, and Borates and is an extremely rare gemstone. It occurs as transparent colourless orthorhombic prismatic crystals which are usually well crystallized, sometimes twinned. Its colors range to white, white grayish, and yellowish white. Crystals are striated along the prisms. It is very hard and has one directi (read full)

Tektites

Tektites: Tektites are glass specimens rich in silica that many believed were actually meteorites. But, the locations in which tektites have been found, and their chemistry, led scientists to suggest that they may not in fact have come from outside planet Earth. Another conjecture is that tektites are formed from rocks that melted after being hit by a meteorite. Tektites actually have a composition not unl (read full)

Jadeite

Jadeite: Jadeite is a silicate of sodium and aluminum, and is a member of the Clinopyroxene group of minerals. It is so called because it is the source of one of the ornamental materials commonly known as Jade. It has a monoclinic crystal system, and occurs as granular aggregates of small crystals, but has occasionally been found in crystals of a few centimeters. The color varies a great deal because of t (read full)

Spessartine

Spessartine: Spessartine is the manganese-aluminum variety of Garnet, belonging to its sub-group of aluminum garnets. Garnets are a group of silicate minerals that all crystallize in the isometric system and have the same chemical formula, but in a diversity of proportions, so garnets show up as different varieties, in a broad range of environments. Spessartine possesses the form typical of garnet crystals, w (read full)

Meerschaum

Meerschaum: Meerschaum is a clay-like hydrous magnesium silicate. It has no crystals, and occurs as earthy aggregates, porcellanous masses, nodular, and porous. In the fresh state it is soapy and soft, but hard when dried. It sticks to the tongue and its taste sets the teeth on edge. It is opaque, has flat conchoidal, earthy fracture, and an orthorhombic microcrystalline system. Because of its high porosity (read full)

Cassiterite

Cassiterite: Cassiterite may form as short or slender prismatic, or bipyramidal, elbow-shaped crystals. It has a crystal surface reflecting light as in a mirror. They may occur as massive, granular, botryoidal, and reniform. When found in granular, banded, fibrous masses, it looks like wood. When found in groups of large bright crystals, it is usually called "diamond tin." A red variety cut for collectors is k (read full)

Padparadscha

Padparadscha: Padparadschah is the name given to the orange-yellow sapphire, a gem variety of Corundum. It is also differentiated from the yellow sapphire, and is one of the rarest varieties of corundum. The main sapphire-bearing rocks are marble, basalt, or pegmatite. It is mined mainly from alluvial deposits or deposits formed by weathering, rarely from the primary rock. It usually occurs in placer deposit (read full)

Orthoclase

Orthoclase: Orthoclase mineral is a silicate of potassium and aluminum, belonging to the Feldspar group. It has the same composition as microcline, but is stable at slightly higher temperatures. It occurs as prismatic, sometimes flat-sided crystals, but in rocks it is usually anhedral. It may be perfectly transparent and yellow or almost colorless, but it is more often semi-opaque and white to grayish-white, (read full)

Peridot

Peridot: Peridot is the greener type of gem-quality specimen of Forsterite-Olivine, which is an important, rock-forming mineral, a silicate of magnesium and iron. Often their names are used interchangeably. The bottle-green/olive green type of olivine is also called olivine. The yellower type of olivine is called Chrysolite. It forms as thick, tabular crystals, frequently with wedge-shaped terminations. T (read full)

Lazulite

Lazulite: Lazulite is a compact, pleochroitic mineral which forms a series to scorzalite. It is dichroic, with a monoclinic crystal system. It appears as pointed, pseudo-dipyramidal, bright blue crystals in microgranular masses. It is hard, medium heavy, fragile with indistinct prismatic cleavage. It is translucent, with vitreous luster. It is infusible, discolors and breaks into small fragments when heat (read full)

Scheelite

Scheelite: Scheelite is a mineral in the group of Sulfates, Chromates, Molybdates, Tungstates. It has the same crystal structure and outside appearance as powellite. But scheelite is a calcium-tungstate, while powellite is a calcium-molybdate.

In rocks, scheelite may appear as crystals like two pyramids connected at its bases, or pseudo-octahedral, or having table-like faces, with detectable p (read full)

Turquoise

Turquoise: Turquoise is a hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminum in the Phosphates, Arsenates, Vanadates group, with a triclinic crystal system. It rarely occurs as prismatic crystals. It is usually found as light-blue or green masses, nodules, and veins, sometimes filling cavities in various rocks. When it occurs as thin strips, it is tighter and brightly-colored at the center, lighter and porous on the (read full)

Sillimanite

Sillimanite: Sillimanite is a grayish-blue aluminum silicate with an orthorhombic crystal system. It is trimorphic with andalusite and kyanite. All three have the same chemical compound but their atoms each arrange to create three different crystal forms. It appears as long, slender crystals without distinct terminations, in off-white, gray, brown, pale green, slate-blue, blue-green, and these crystals are of (read full)

Oligoclase

Oligoclase: Oligoclase is a mineral of the plagioclase feldspar series, other members of which are Labradorite and Anorthite. It forms as tabular crystals, which are commonly twinned, with parallel or criss-cross twinning striations. It appears as massive, granular, or compact. It may show brilliant reflections from inclusions. It is light, transparent to translucent, with a vitreous luster and may come in (read full)

Opal

Opal: Opal is hydrated silicon dioxide. It has the same chemical composition as quartz but contains about one-tenth (and sometimes as much as one-third) water. It is never crystalline, but it displays a rich play of colors, or "fire" caused by the internal refraction of light by the array of tiny spheres of amorphous silica which for a compact, three-dimensional network in the mineral. It may be somew (read full)

Jasper Chalcedony

Jasper Chalcedony: Jasper is the opaque form of Chalcedony, the microcrystalline varieties of quartz that form concretionary deposits, partially of organic origin in the case of jasper. It is commonly microscopically fibrous, massive, and has a nearly wax-like luster. It has a lower density than ordinary quartz. It is the archetypal collectable beach pebble, dense, fine crystalline, translucent to opaque, and cons (read full)

Pearl

Pearl: Pearl is one of four main ornamental materials that are classified as "organic" gems, the other three being coral, ivory, and amber. About 92 percent of pearl is calcium carbonate, in the form of aragonite crystals, held together by an organic substance (concholin), which is identical to the horny outer layer of oyster shells, plus a small quantity of water. Mother-of-pearl has a simila (read full)

Fluorite

Fluorite: Fluorite is a widely-distributed mineral in the Halide classification, and is now mined in vast quantities. It is a suitable mineral for collectors and is rarely cut as a gem, but massive varieties are carved as ornamental objects. It appears in cubes, octahedrons, dodecahedrons, while other forms are rarer. Compact, banded, and concretionary masses are frequently found. Most fine crystals of flu (read full)

Gypsum

Gypsum: Gypsum is the most common sulphate mineral. It is usually the first evaporite mineral to be precipitated form water due to its poor solubility. Varieties include Selenite (or "spectacle stone), which is colorless and transparent; Satin Spar, the fibrous, translucent form with silky luster, which when cut cabochon shows pearly chatoyant effects; Alabaster, used for ornaments, which is firm, fine-gr (read full)

Sapphire

Sapphire: Sapphire is the blue variety of Corundum. Sapphires can be a very dark blue, to the point of seeming dense and blackish from a distance, sometimes accompanied by a blue to dull green pleochroism, which is only visible from the side in cut stones. They may also be a strong, but not too bright blue, easily recognizable from a distance, this being the real color. Other possibilities are light, usual (read full)

Diopside

Diopside: Diopside is a type of Clinopyroxene, which are abundant, rock-forming minerals. These are embedded and surface-growing crystals, short columnar, and tabular, almost square or octagonal in cross section. It is the magnesium-bearing end member in the isomorphous, monoclinic diopside-hedenbergite series, a complete solid solution series in which two intermediate members, salite and ferrosalite, have (read full)

Topaz

Topaz: The transparent, colored crystals, which also have good luster, are widely used as gems.
Topaz is a silicate of aluminum containing fluorine and hydroxyl which occurs in a variety of delicate colors, nicely added by impurities. It is often found in short to long crystal prisms with pyramid-shaped ends, or just clean finished edges. It is often white, semiopaque, milky, or a faded yellow, (read full)

Pyrope

Pyrope: Pyrope is the iron magnesium and aluminum silicate of the pyrope-almandine series in the Pyralspite group of the Garnet family. Its beautiful deep-red gem quality makes it one of the most popular. Pure pyrope is colorless, but its red color, sometimes very bright, is due to small quantities of chrome in the crystal structure. It appears as dodecahedral or trapezohedral crystals, dark red, usually (read full)

Zircon

Zircon: Zircon is a zirconium silicate with a tetragonal crystal system, and also contains thorium and uranium. It appears as stubby, prismatic, isolated or sometimes dipyramidal, like two pyramids connected at their bases; or in twins, colorless to yellow, red, brown, gray or green, in irregular granules. It is very hard, heavy, with indistinct cleavage, and shell-like fracture. It is sometimes perfect (read full)

Shell

Shell: Shell is the hard, protective, outer layer covering of certain creatures found in saltwater or freshwater, such as mollusks, snails, and turtles. This layer consists of calcium-carbonate and chitin, secreted by the soft tissue mantle of most mollusks. The inner surface of the shell is made from smooth nacre which covers the mantle.
Shell is used as inexpensive material for various purposes (read full)